Live and Let Live, or Let the Left Live?

March 31, 2017 Bob le flambeur 21

When historians of philosophy look back on our age they may be surprised by the tolerance analytic philosophers have displayed toward cultural studies, queer studies, postcolonial studies, LGBT studies, women’s studies, gender studies, African-American/black studies, disability studies, and those sections of slightly more traditional disciplines (for example, anthropology, sociology, and English) that have also been dominated by Theory. After all, it is well-known that these disciplines—henceforth, I shall refer to them as studies—exhibit only an [Continue reading]

After Veritas: Why journalists are so poor at their jobs, part 1

March 28, 2017 Jan Sobieski IV 2

Throughout its months of coverage for the 2016 election, the press made an awful wreck of itself. Not only did it and the polls it relied upon grossly overlook the groundswell of support in the Midwest swing states that propelled Donald Trump to presidential victory, the Fourth Estate appeared to openly shill for Hillary Clinton. Of course, conservatives have maintained such partisan hackery for leftist candidates and causes for years. After Wikileaks’ revelations, this bias [Continue reading]

A Response to Jenkins and Ichikawa: If You Like Your Mononormativity, You Can Keep Your Mononormativity

March 25, 2017 Walter Montgomery 6

This post was inspired by the recent widely read Chronicle of Higher Education’s “I have Multiple Loves”, featuring University of British Columbia philosopher Carrie Ichikawa Jenkins. The subtitle is, “Carrie Jenkins makes the philosophical case for polyamory,” but there isn’t much of a case made. Instead, it’s more of an extended interview in which Jenkins rebuffs some rather weakly stated objections to polyamory. The article touches on many other topics too, such as analytic philosophy [Continue reading]

Go Ahead, Make My Day—Defund the NEH!

March 20, 2017 Walter Montgomery 10

I was really encouraged by the Trump administration’s recent budget proposal because it included the elimination of the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) and the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA). It’s about time! Unsurprisingly, the proposal was met with anger by most in the humanities. For instance, the American Association of  University Professors drafted an open letter of opposition, calling for members to sign it. At publication time, their homepage also featured a petition [Continue reading]

Equal Opportunity and Justice

March 17, 2017 AR-15 13

“Equality of opportunity has seemed to many writers to be the minimal egalitarian goal, questionable (if at all) only for being too weak.” Robert Nozick, ASU, p. 235. While the left stresses equality of results, some on the right promote equality of opportunity and think that everyone deserves an equal chance. While they do not see equality of outcomes as a matter of justice, they think that equality of opportunity is a requirement of justice [Continue reading]

International Women’s Day: Taking Stock

March 13, 2017 Touchstone 7

I learned this year that International Women’s Day was March 8th thanks in large part to a number of gals on my social media platforms as well as virtue signaling men (i.e., emasculated losers) who are more than willing to capitalize on the day. Help me, Dear Reader, to understand what is being celebrated and why. I understand the reason Democrats have for employing identity politics—it is so that they can stay in office and pass the [Continue reading]

From Bad Logic to Bad Philosophy: the Case of Alain Badiou

March 10, 2017 Neven Sesardić 9

“…one cannot corner me in some supposed ignorance… in the matter of the formal complexities…” —A. Badiou (2006, p. xiv)   Alain Badiou is a well-known French philosopher who likes to use ideas from logic and mathematics in his philosophical thinking. Given his bad reputation among some analytic philosophers—for example, Jon Elster (2012, 160) calls him an “obscurantist”—one may wonder whether it can be demonstrated that in some of his works Badiou displays basic ignorance [Continue reading]

The New Jim Crow Chapter 1: The Rebirth of Caste

March 6, 2017 AR-15 5

Several months ago, Rightly Considered began the task of reviewing one of the sacred texts of contemporary leftism, The New Jim Crow. We have returned during this Lenten season to chastise ourselves by reading and reviewing Chapter 1: The Rebirth of Caste. Alexander’s first chapter waffles between two goals, both of which are seemingly intertwined: (1) to present a brief catalog of black subjugation at the hands of slavers in the antebellum United States, the [Continue reading]

The Curious Case of the Christian Abortion Cake

March 4, 2017 Jan Sobieski IV 8

Consider: A 20-something woman walks into a bakery named Immaculate Risings — the double entendre refers to both Jesus’ resurrection and dough’s amazing transformation while in a hot oven. The woman proceeds to the counter to make her order. After the baker bids her good day and asks how he can assist her, the woman requests a cake to commemorate her first abortion. The baker, a portly, elderly chap pauses for a moment. Shaking his [Continue reading]

Philosophy’s Culture of Silence

March 1, 2017 Bob le flambeur 4

Neven Sesardic’s recent book, When Reason Goes on Holiday, provides a detailed account of the morally questionable actions undertaken in the interest of political causes by some of the most important philosophers in the analytic tradition: Otto Neurath, Rudolf Carnap, Imre Lakatos, Donald Davidson, Hilary Putnam, among several others. Some of their actions were not just questionable from a moral point of view, but outright reprehensible. Yet, as Sesardic points out in the conclusion to [Continue reading]