A New Philosophy Resource

May 30, 2017 Walter Montgomery 0

There is a a relatively new resource available to philosophers looking to publish work, which readers might find useful. This website gives information on 182 different philosophy journals’ average time of review, the percentage of papers accepted for publication, the quality of the review, the overall experience with the journal, and the average time to publication.

Changes Coming

May 18, 2017 Walter Montgomery 0

Changes are coming to Rightly Considered. I wanted to take a moment to announce that, as some of our regular contributors finish up semesters. We started this website with hopes that it might gain some following, but not really knowing what to expect. We didn’t know whether anyone outside of ourselves would care. What we learned in the following months was that people do care—we’ve had a number of other major blogs link to us, we’ve gotten [Continue reading]

Hypatia: A Bridge Too Far?

May 10, 2017 Walter Montgomery 4

Some might look at the recent outrage over Hypatia‘s publication of Rebecca Tuvel’s paper defending transracialism as an indication that the radical left in philosophy has finally gone too far—we have finally hit the high water mark of cultural Marxism in the academy. I don’t see much grounds for optimism here, if you are on the right. The fact of the matter is that this is an in-house fight between people unified in their belief [Continue reading]

Earth Day

April 23, 2017 Walter Montgomery 9

Caring for the environment is important, but I’ve never celebrated Earth Day. This is because it is largely a propaganda tool for the left, used to define what caring for the environment means on their terms. It’s worth looking at the history of how Earth Day came to be. The first Earth Day was in 1970, and was purposely tied to the anti-Vietnam student protest movement of the time period, as is openly admitted by [Continue reading]

Quick Reaction: Was the Syria Strike Morally Permissible?*

April 8, 2017 Walter Montgomery 18

Thursday’s U.S. missile strike on Syria, in response to the earlier chemical attack by Assad’s regime, makes for great applied ethics material. I don’t have much time to explore this event in depth, but I thought I’d write up some brief thoughts on whether the strike was morally permissible, and then open it up for further discussion in the comments thread. I’ll set aside questions concerning whether this was prudent, whether it was Trump breaking [Continue reading]

A Response to Jenkins and Ichikawa: If You Like Your Mononormativity, You Can Keep Your Mononormativity

March 25, 2017 Walter Montgomery 6

This post was inspired by the recent widely read Chronicle of Higher Education’s “I have Multiple Loves”, featuring University of British Columbia philosopher Carrie Ichikawa Jenkins. The subtitle is, “Carrie Jenkins makes the philosophical case for polyamory,” but there isn’t much of a case made. Instead, it’s more of an extended interview in which Jenkins rebuffs some rather weakly stated objections to polyamory. The article touches on many other topics too, such as analytic philosophy [Continue reading]

Go Ahead, Make My Day—Defund the NEH!

March 20, 2017 Walter Montgomery 10

I was really encouraged by the Trump administration’s recent budget proposal because it included the elimination of the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) and the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA). It’s about time! Unsurprisingly, the proposal was met with anger by most in the humanities. For instance, the American Association of  University Professors drafted an open letter of opposition, calling for members to sign it. At publication time, their homepage also featured a petition [Continue reading]

The Demetriou Debacle and the Shameless Hypocrisy of Daily Nous

February 19, 2017 Walter Montgomery 33

Daily Nous recently reported on a controversy surrounding philosopher Dan Demetriou (University of Minnesota, Morris). Demetriou, who describes himself as “ideologically right,” published a Facebook post (whose privacy status was set to “friends only”) that someone decided to share publicly. Comments from his post were then widely circulated at the University of Minnesota in an effort to shame him. The chancellor issued a typical virtue-signalling statement about how she found Demetriou’s comments “both personally and [Continue reading]

There are No “Safe Spaces”

February 13, 2017 Walter Montgomery 8

Today, I bring good news. Not all millennials are little snowflakes—maybe not even a majority. At the beginning of this semester, I asked my students to a write short essay on whether they thought so-called “safe spaces” are appropriate at universities (see here for another Rightly Considered post addressing safe spaces). Because you see, at my university, the students have had safe spaces shoved down their throats lately. A safe space was immediately set up after [Continue reading]

Make Philosophy Great Again: End Leiter Reports and Daily Nous

January 12, 2017 Walter Montgomery 24

For many years, Leiter Reports served as the primary philosophy blog for professional philosophy. Many have criticized Leiter for his handling of squabbles with other philosophers, which seemingly led to many wanting an alternative. Into this vacuum Justin Weinberg stepped, creating Daily Nous. Daily Nous seemed like an improvement at first. Leiter’s polemical, ad hominem approach was replaced with the measured and thoughtful attitude of Weinberg. But, over time, it became clear that Weinberg was [Continue reading]