International Women’s Day: Taking Stock

March 13, 2017 Touchstone 7

I learned this year that International Women’s Day was March 8th thanks in large part to a number of gals on my social media platforms as well as virtue signaling men (i.e., emasculated losers) who are more than willing to capitalize on the day. Help me, Dear Reader, to understand what is being celebrated and why. I understand the reason Democrats have for employing identity politics—it is so that they can stay in office and pass the [Continue reading]

From Bad Logic to Bad Philosophy: the Case of Alain Badiou

March 10, 2017 Neven Sesardić 9

“…one cannot corner me in some supposed ignorance… in the matter of the formal complexities…” —A. Badiou (2006, p. xiv)   Alain Badiou is a well-known French philosopher who likes to use ideas from logic and mathematics in his philosophical thinking. Given his bad reputation among some analytic philosophers—for example, Jon Elster (2012, 160) calls him an “obscurantist”—one may wonder whether it can be demonstrated that in some of his works Badiou displays basic ignorance [Continue reading]

The New Jim Crow Chapter 1: The Rebirth of Caste

March 6, 2017 AR-15 5

Several months ago, Rightly Considered began the task of reviewing one of the sacred texts of contemporary leftism, The New Jim Crow. We have returned during this Lenten season to chastise ourselves by reading and reviewing Chapter 1: The Rebirth of Caste. Alexander’s first chapter waffles between two goals, both of which are seemingly intertwined: (1) to present a brief catalog of black subjugation at the hands of slavers in the antebellum United States, the [Continue reading]

The Curious Case of the Christian Abortion Cake

March 4, 2017 Jan Sobieski IV 8

Consider: A 20-something woman walks into a bakery named Immaculate Risings — the double entendre refers to both Jesus’ resurrection and dough’s amazing transformation while in a hot oven. The woman proceeds to the counter to make her order. After the baker bids her good day and asks how he can assist her, the woman requests a cake to commemorate her first abortion. The baker, a portly, elderly chap pauses for a moment. Shaking his [Continue reading]

Philosophy’s Culture of Silence

March 1, 2017 Bob le flambeur 4

Neven Sesardic’s recent book, When Reason Goes on Holiday, provides a detailed account of the morally questionable actions undertaken in the interest of political causes by some of the most important philosophers in the analytic tradition: Otto Neurath, Rudolf Carnap, Imre Lakatos, Donald Davidson, Hilary Putnam, among several others. Some of their actions were not just questionable from a moral point of view, but outright reprehensible. Yet, as Sesardic points out in the conclusion to [Continue reading]

I Demand Satisfaction (Part V)

February 27, 2017 Jack Burton 2

And so our series concludes (finally)…Thus far we have rehearsed themes associated with honor and defense of the same, the necessity of Rational Violence coupled with its associated constraints,  justifications for violent individual reprisal to insults (and the like), as well as parallels between warring states and warring pissed-off individuals. Now it’s time to ask the all-important (and yet thus-far-studiously-avoided) question: how in God’s sweet name could a “barbarous”, “bloodthirsty,” “disgusting” practice such as dueling [Continue reading]

Unnatural Allies: The Left, Gays and Muslims

February 23, 2017 Catholic Hulk 27

The political left, the forerunners and champions of the LBGT movement, further the political clout of Muslims, but Muslims, by far and large, are opposed to LBGT rights, recognition and political advancement; hence, the furtherance of the political clout for Muslims comes with at least some detriment to the LBGT movement. So why does the left support Muslims? It seems so self-defeating. I mean, readers, consider these facts. In the Muslim-majority countries of Afghanistan, Brunei, Iran, [Continue reading]

The Demetriou Debacle and the Shameless Hypocrisy of Daily Nous

February 19, 2017 Common Sense 33

Daily Nous recently reported on a controversy surrounding philosopher Dan Demetriou (University of Minnesota, Morris). Demetriou, who describes himself as “ideologically right,” published a Facebook post (whose privacy status was set to “friends only”) that someone decided to share publicly. Comments from his post were then widely circulated at the University of Minnesota in an effort to shame him. The chancellor issued a typical virtue-signalling statement about how she found Demetriou’s comments “both personally and [Continue reading]

An Even More Modest Proposal

February 17, 2017 Federal Philosopher 5

As an avid animal rights and abortion activist, you may have been asked by a conservative, in a dishonest attempt to score rhetorical points against you, how those two positions can be consistent. “How can you with one hand fight to have the moral status of animals recognized and protected, yet not fight with the other to have the moral status of human fetuses recognized and protected?” they ask. In their book-length response to this [Continue reading]

Farming for Philosophers

February 16, 2017 Muckraker 9

Timothy Hsiao teaches philosophy at Florida Gulf Coast University. He’s written several papers on the moral justification for eating meat. His most recent paper offers a defense of industrial animal agriculture, also known as “factory farming.” Most people think that there is nothing wrong with eating industrially farmed meat. Interestingly, even ethicists—who are more likely to rate meat consumption as a morally bad thing—still consume meat at nearly the same rate as non-philosophers. But some, including not a few [Continue reading]