Basket of Deplorable Links

August 11, 2017 Walter Montgomery 3

Poll Finds More Germans fear the Spaghetti Monster that ISIS (or might as well). You should be skeptical of arguments for open borders (duh). Is climate science Dadaist science? Friend of the blog, Neven Sesardic, weighs in on whether philosophy really improves thinking for students. Angelo M. Codevilla, Professor Emeritus of International Relations at Boston University writes, ‘The Rise of Political Correctness‘. Is the political thought found in Martin Heidegger a threat to liberal democracy? [Continue reading]

The Google Gulag

August 10, 2017 Bob le flambeur 23

A lot has been written on Google’s firing of James Damore, the author of an internal memo about the assumptions underlying his former employer’s “diversity” program. Whether or not one agrees with the memo, it certainly is in line with mainstream scientific research concerning differences in interests, abilities, and mental illnesses between men and women. Others have pointed this out here, here, and here. Even the World Health Organization (WHO) accepts that women are more strongly disposed [Continue reading]

A Hulkly Response to Bernstein’s Rejoinder

August 3, 2017 Catholic Hulk 0

So C’zar Bernstein replied to my criticism of his article on the death penalty. I thank him for that. You can see his rejoinder here. You can see my initial reply here and his initial piece here. This exchange can get confusing for readers, so I will try to be clear and concise in this response. That said, this is a rather long blogpost, so I apologize in advance. If I address this issue again, [Continue reading]

Charlie Gard: A Lesson in Conservative Cluelessness About the Culture Wars

August 2, 2017 Jan Sobieski IV 6

In recent weeks, the right-wing commentariat has made quite the fuss about a European court that ordered the removal of life support for Charlie Gard, the infant son of Chris Gard and Cathy Yates who was afflicted with a rare genetic mitochondrial disease. And rightfully so – death panels, the rationing of care, and other grotesqueries are the result of a government-run healthcare system. The Gard family just provides a face for it. However, many [Continue reading]

Bernstein on the Death Penalty

July 26, 2017 Catholic Hulk 1

We haven’t had a blogpost about the death penalty here at Rightly Considered, so I figured it was time. Plus, Ohio just killed a man just a few hours before I began writing this blogpost, so that is even more reason for me to write about the death penalty. Here I criticize C’zar Bernstein’s rejoinder to anti-death penalty arguments, finding some of his counter arguments rather weak. That’s not to say that I agree with [Continue reading]

Why a “Philosopher of Color” Declines to Contribute

July 26, 2017 Bob le flambeur 16

Georgetown professor Rebecca–“suck my giant queer cock”–Kukla recently encouraged “scholars of color” to contribute to a special issue of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal on Trump and the 2016 election. Of course, in her editorial, Kukla makes no secret of what her own take is on this event. For example, she warns of the harmful impact Trump’s policies will have on the environment, and on “socially vulnerable and stigmatized Americans”. In any case, it [Continue reading]

Responding to Some Pro-Abort Feminist Bloggers

July 21, 2017 Catholic Hulk 3

It occurred to me that RC has not had a blogpost about abortion, which is weird, because anti-abortion philosophy has been a conservative thing for many years. So to remedy this, I did a casual search over the web, looking to see what pro-abort feminists have been saying about abortion. I’m not impressed with the quality of their posts. Check it out. Tracie Morrissey from Jezebel writes: But who the fuck are you to actively [Continue reading]

The American Philosophical Association’s Explicit Bias about Implicit Bias

July 20, 2017 Bob le flambeur 0

“As philosophers, we are professionally involved in unearthing assumptions and values underlying ordinary thought and practice, and subjecting them to critical examination”: this is the opening line of the chapter on “countering implicit bias” in the American Philosophical Association (APA)’s just-released draft Good Practices Guide. What follows this opening line is an uncritical, and one-sided, presentation of implicit bias, leaving lots of “assumptions and values” to be unearthed by unmentionable websites such as this one; [Continue reading]

More on Transgenderism and Birth Certificates (Part I)

July 19, 2017 Lucius Vorenus 163

Since joining the gang here at Rightly Considered, I have been waiting for a suitable topic on which to make my first post. That opportunity came with the news that mere weeks after Canada’s Bill C-16 passed, there is an effort in British Columbia to remove sex/gender markers from birth certificates, allegedly because such markers constitute human rights violations. Alas, Catholic Hulk beat me to it, but I thought I would make a post anyway [Continue reading]

Necessities of Country Living

July 17, 2017 Federal Philosopher 5

My husband shot and killed a groundhog today. We just moved to a house out in the country, and it’s a work in progress. Part of the work involves protecting the integrity of the house from elemental and critter damage. My husband knows I’m an animal lover, and it’s not that he isn’t, but we all know that sometimes doing unpleasant things is necessary. I didn’t understand why killing the groundhog was necessary at first. [Continue reading]