Mills College and Academic Freedom

June 13, 2017 Touchstone 0

Sadly, the Mills College board of Trustees is scheduled to ratify its Financial Stabilization Plan, which includes terminating the Philosophy and Journalism Departments. It will also terminate tenured professors in those departments. In response, a petition has been started to preserve these departments in the name of academic freedom. I found this confusing. Although I think philosophy (and not journalism—lol) is “a cornerstone of a liberal arts education”, and I don’t want to see it cut, [Continue reading]

A Look at the Philosophy Behind the Hypatia Affair

June 12, 2017 Walter Montgomery 9

When Daily Nous first broke the Hypatia story from last month with this post, it sparked a flurry of reactions from across the discipline of philosophy. Many far-left feminists objected to the article, claiming that its publication was irresponsible and harmful to both the transgender community and the black community. In this post, I’m going to examine the public Facebook reaction of professor Lisa Guenther at Vanderbilt University, who works in phenomenology, feminism, and mass [Continue reading]

A New Philosophy Resource

May 30, 2017 Walter Montgomery 0

There is a a relatively new resource available to philosophers looking to publish work, which readers might find useful. This website gives information on 182 different philosophy journals’ average time of review, the percentage of papers accepted for publication, the quality of the review, the overall experience with the journal, and the average time to publication.

Hypatia: A Bridge Too Far?

May 10, 2017 Walter Montgomery 4

Some might look at the recent outrage over Hypatia‘s publication of Rebecca Tuvel’s paper defending transracialism as an indication that the radical left in philosophy has finally gone too far—we have finally hit the high water mark of cultural Marxism in the academy. I don’t see much grounds for optimism here, if you are on the right. The fact of the matter is that this is an in-house fight between people unified in their belief [Continue reading]

Quick Reaction: Was the Syria Strike Morally Permissible?*

April 8, 2017 Walter Montgomery 18

Thursday’s U.S. missile strike on Syria, in response to the earlier chemical attack by Assad’s regime, makes for great applied ethics material. I don’t have much time to explore this event in depth, but I thought I’d write up some brief thoughts on whether the strike was morally permissible, and then open it up for further discussion in the comments thread. I’ll set aside questions concerning whether this was prudent, whether it was Trump breaking [Continue reading]

Go Ahead, Make My Day—Defund the NEH!

March 20, 2017 Walter Montgomery 10

I was really encouraged by the Trump administration’s recent budget proposal because it included the elimination of the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) and the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA). It’s about time! Unsurprisingly, the proposal was met with anger by most in the humanities. For instance, the American Association of  University Professors drafted an open letter of opposition, calling for members to sign it. At publication time, their homepage also featured a petition [Continue reading]

Make Philosophy Great Again: End Leiter Reports and Daily Nous

January 12, 2017 Walter Montgomery 24

For many years, Leiter Reports served as the primary philosophy blog for professional philosophy. Many have criticized Leiter for his handling of squabbles with other philosophers, which seemingly led to many wanting an alternative. Into this vacuum Justin Weinberg stepped, creating Daily Nous. Daily Nous seemed like an improvement at first. Leiter’s polemical, ad hominem approach was replaced with the measured and thoughtful attitude of Weinberg. But, over time, it became clear that Weinberg was [Continue reading]

A Conservative Virtue

December 17, 2016 Walter Montgomery 0

True conservatives are cautious in making judgments. That’s not to say that all who identify as conservative are cautious in making judgments; when such people fail to be cautious in making judgments, they fail to act in a truly conservative way. Nor is it to say that liberals are uncautious in making judgments. A liberal could be cautious in making a judgment, but in doing so, he would not be acting liberally; rather, he would [Continue reading]